Connecting Dots

While I was fooling around the Play store I found this recently released nice, simple and very addictive game. It’s called the Dots. The funny thing about this game is that once you get started playing it you won’t feel bored even it just has to do the same thing over and over again.

The experience that I felt was somewhat different from other games I have played before (but this could be only me). I think the main psychological factor that keeps me in the game is its simplicity and the options you get to boost your score and the opportunity you get to use those options. So there should be also a bit of a planning involved.

Talking about the game basics there are two game mods “Time mode” and “Moves mode”. In time mode there’s a timer which runs for 60 seconds for a single round, so all your connecting skills should be used in this time frame. And in moves mode you’ll get 30 moves to scream at in a round. I usually go with the Time mode because it is fun and challenging.

Once you filled your bucket with enough earned dots you can go ahead and acquire one or more above mentioned options. They call these options as Power Ups.

Here I will list those Power Ups

  • Time Stops: With this Power Up you can hold off your timer for 5 seconds and it requires 1000 dots for 5 tryouts. It’s a pretty neat Power Up by the way. (In moves mode you’ll get extra five moves)
  • Shrinkers: This Power Up just shrinks any dot from the board. You just have to double tap on a dot. It requires 500 dots for five tryouts and can be used only once in a round.
  • Expanders: This Power Up I haven’t used yet. As described it removes all the same color dots. It requires 5000 dots for five tryouts. This Power Up will definitely come in handy.

That’s pretty much it about this beautiful game. If you are bored or trying to eat up some free time this game will certainly do the job for you.

So here’s the Play store URL give it a try

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nerdyoctopus.gamedots

Some screen shots (from my Nexus 4)

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UPDATE
I noticed something new in the game’s About section. Actually it was already there but I wasn’t so curious to check it out.
There are few sections, most of them has quotes of wisdom by an admired person.  But one of them has this funny little dots of all colors and you can tap on them, which will eventually makes a unique sound for each dot.

Here, check out some screen shots:-

Screenshot_2013-09-20-22-44-53 Screenshot_2013-09-20-22-45-50 Screenshot_2013-09-20-22-46-00 Screenshot_2013-09-20-22-46-17 Screenshot_2013-09-20-22-46-26

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Amazon WS EC2 – connect via SSH RSA

So you own an up and running Amazon EC2 instance. And you want it to access via hassle free way. This guided post will describe on how you can do it with few steps.

Note: Just for the convenience I’m referring some steps from this blog here – http://thekeesh.com/2011/05/setting-up-user-accounts-password-authentication-and-ssh-keys-on-a-new-ec2-instance/

OK before I start assume you have an up and running EC2 instance. If so grab the public DNS from your AWS management console

EC2 Management Console 2013-09-15 15-54-28
It will be probably something like

ec2-#############.compute-1.amazonaws.com

Once that is acquired I again assume you have already made your Key-pair and saved it while you are in the process of creating a new instance

EC2 Management Console 2013-09-15 16-01-07

Once that is also in place go to your terminal and CD to the location you saved your Key [your-key-pair.pem] and try to do SSH

$ ssh -i your-key-pair.pem ubuntu@ec2-#############.compute-1.amazonaws.com

[the default user will be ubuntu for Amazon Machine Images (AMIs).]

Now you should be inside the AMS terminal

aws-terminal

Ok now you have to do is add your self up as a new user and give the root privileges (sudoers). Simply follow execute the following commands on to the AWS terminal

Adding yourself as a user:

$ adduser yourself

granting privileges

$ sudo visudo

find the line root  ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL and the line yourself ALL=(ALL) ALL under it.

Then enable password authentication via (I used the nano editor)

$ sudo nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config
PasswordAuthentication no to PasswordAuthentication yes

Afterward reload the ssh configuration

$ sudo /etc/init.d/ssh reload

Ok now logout from the current session and log back as yourself

$ ssh yourself@ec2-#############.compute-1.amazonaws.com

And to make sure everything is working just fine, execute following

$ sudo -v

You will be promted to enter the password you have provided while creating the user(yourself). Enter that and if everything went well you will get no output on terminal.

Now lets remove this troublesome password authentication replacing SSH RSA public key authentication

To do that first you need to create a SSH RSA public key

So logout from the AWS terminal and from your local terminal execute the following command (Just press return for all the steps)

local-host$ ssh-keygen -t rsa

And you will get a similar output as below

Enter file in which to save the key (/home/yourself/.ssh/id_rsa):
Created directory ‘/home/yourself/.ssh’.
Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
Enter same passphrase again:
Your identification has been saved in /home/yourself/.ssh/id_rsa.
Your public key has been saved in /home/yourself/.ssh/id_rsa.pub.
The key fingerprint is:
58:3a:80:a5:df:17:b0:af:4f:90:07:c5:3c:01:50:c2 yourself@inux-cc6a

Your public key will be stored in /home/yourself/.ssh/

Now what you have to do is add that key to AWS in order to identify yourself as authorize user.

local-host$ scp ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub yourself@ec2-#############..compute-1.amazonaws.com:/home/yourself

Then again login to the AWS

local-host$ ssh yourself@ec2-#############..compute-1.amazonaws.com:/home/yourself

And place the key file in right place

$ mkdir .ssh
$ mv id_rsa.pub .ssh/authorized_keys
$ chmod 700 .ssh
$ chmod 600 .ssh/authorized_keys

Now you should be able to login without using a password

local-host$ ssh yourself@ec2-#############.compute-1.amazonaws.com

Finally remove the password authentication and root user access

$ sudo vim /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Find the line PasswordAuthentication yes and change it to PasswordAuthentication no.

Also PermitRootLogin yes to PermitRootLogin no

Finally reload the SSH configurations again

$ sudo /etc/init.d/ssh reload

That’s all you need for crating a new user account and allowing authentication via SSH RSA.

If you are still lazy enough to type that long public DNS you can simply assign it to an alias and place it in the ~/.bash_proflle  or ~/.bashrc to make it permanent.

#amazon cloud ssh
alias connect-amazon=’ssh yourself@ec2-#############..compute-1.amazonaws.com’

$ connect-amazon